Don’t Overcome Sales Objections - Bring Them Up!

Denver-Based Sales Leadership Development Available Nationwide

Posted: May 5, 2011

Many sales managers and salespeople ask this question, “Can you teach me or my sales team to overcome objections?” The answer is yes and no. Outdated sales training still teaches this strategy often telling the salesperson that he will need to overcome objections at least three to seven times on a sales call. Doesn’t that just sound exhausting? It’s no wonder prospects won’t tell us the truth! Here are some ways to get out of the objection game and into the sales conversation game.

Many sales managers and salespeople ask this question, “Can you teach me or my sales team to overcome objections?”  The answer is yes and no.  Outdated sales training still teaches this strategy often telling the salesperson that he will need to overcome objections at least three to seven times on a sales call.  Doesn’t that just sound exhausting?  It’s no wonder prospects won’t tell us the truth!  Here are some ways to get out of the objection game and into the sales conversation game.

#1: Bring up the objection before the prospect does

You and your sales team know the objections because you talk about them at every one of your weekly sales meetings!   For example, the prospect has the ability to do what you offer in house such as marketing, IT support, sales training!   Isn’t it  just good common sense to bring the topic up and ask the prospect,  “What’s the reason you are looking to outsource.  Isn’t this something you or your internal team can handle?”  When the salesperson brings up the objection, the truth starts surfaces and real sales dialogue begins.  It’s the difference between a technique sales meeting and a meaningful conversation with your  prospects.

#2: Clarify.  Is it a statement or an objection?

Many salespeople hear the phrases and turn them into objections.  Here is a common one.  “This is more of an investment than I anticipated.”   That’s  simply a statement, not an objection.  The well trained salesperson simply clarifies by asking, “It sounds like you had a budget in mind…can you share that with me?”  You might be surprised at the answer.  “Yes, we did an it was lower.  I guess we will need to tap into one of the other budgets to fund.”

#3: Quit pushing.

I am still amazed at the number of salespeople that think they have the power to convince a person to do something.   If a salesperson had that kind of power, we’d all be eating five helpings of vegetables a day, exercising weekly and getting eight hours of sleep.  What a salesperson has the power to do is facilitate good questions that helps the prospect discover what decision is right for him.

Good Selling!

Colleen Stanley Chief Selling Officer